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Atlanta Sends Seven Teams to HROT Championship

Team Considine Sales & Marketing from Jacksonville North Pulaski High School in Jacksonville, Arkansas posted a time of 26:41 inThe Hot Rodders of Tomorrow (HROT) Engine Challenge started its second half of the schedule at the Summit Atlanta Motorama in Atlanta April 28-29. A total of 11 schools from Alabama and Georgia participated, fielding 19 teams. Seven teams ended the weekend qualified for the Dual National Championship.

Teams that qualified for the championship, and their qualification times, include:

  • Team Considine Sales & Marketing from Jacksonville North Pulaski High School in Jacksonville, Arkansas (26:41)
  • Team Pertronix from Monticello Occupational Education Center in Monticello, Arkansas (27:50)
  • Team Summit Racing from Peach County High School in Fort Valley Georgia (28:41)
  • Team Derale Performance from Maxwell High School of Technology in Lawrenceville, Georgia (32:03)
  • Team Fel-Pro from Sylvan Hills High School in Sherwood, Arkansas (32:22)
  • Team R&R Marketing from Etowah High School in Woodstock, Georgia (32:26)
  • Team Champion Spark Plugs from Maxwell High School of Technology in Lawrenceville, Georgia (32:31).

Hot Rodders now has 33 teams that have qualified for the Dual National Championship and six qualifying events left before the end of the season.

To qualify for the Dual National Championship, a team must finish disassembling and reassembling a small-block Chevrolet engine in less than 33 minutes, including penalties.

Junior Engine Challenge

Kids of all ages were using tools and working on an engine at the Hot Rodders of Tomorrow Jr Engine Challenge in Atlanta. Several participants spent several hours at the display, building the engine multiple times throughout the day.

Teams in the Junior Engine Challenge are made up of two individuals, with one team member being between five and 18 years old. Together they must completely disassemble and reassemble a complete single cylinder OHV engine, utilizing only basic hand tools. The premise of the contest is to help youngsters develop great communication skills and self-esteem, along with problem-solving skills and an understanding of internal combustion engines.

Third grader Parker Edwards from Bethlehem, Georgia attended the event to watch her older sister compete in the High School Engine Challenge and was excited to learn she could also get in on an engine build. Parker got geared up-wearing a bandana, safety glasses, and shop towel around her waist just like her big sister-and did a 3-2-1 countdown to begin her own build.

Parker hopes to join a high school team like her big sister when the time comes.

For more information, visit HotRoddersofTomorrow.com or connect with the group on social media.

To start a team or to learn about sponsorship opportunities, contact Rodney Bingham at [email protected] or call 815-722-5460.

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